The seller's inspection: Inspecting a home before listing can be a good move
	You take good care of your home and when you are ready to sell, why have it inspected? After all, the buyer will have an inspection before the deal.
	Should you save the $350 to $500 it costs to have an inspection and hope for the best?
	Maybe not. It might well pay for a seller have a home inspection before they list. 
	Sellers who have owned a home for some years might not recognize problems that have cropped up.  If they were to keep their home, they would eventually discover and fix these issues. But, during the sale process, home issues can be a nasty surprise and delay or even kill a deal.
	The business of selling a home and buying a new one is tricky enough but when a good offer is on the table, at just the time they are buying a new home, sellers don't want the deal to fall through. Since most deals are contingent on inspection, a potential buyer can always opt out if their own inspection uncovers issues. That starts the sale process over in a big way, with the seller being forced to address problems and the buyer potentially moving on.
	Inspectors take a close look at the home's inner health in 10 areas:  Interior and exterior, structure, roofing, plumbing, electrical, heating, air conditioning, ventilation, and fireplaces.
	These detailed evaluations can identify the kind of problems that are easily fixed, but might cost the seller money and delays after the buyer's inspection.
	On roofs, for example, inspectors study shingles, flashings, roof drainage, skylights and chimneys. A seller might not want to put on a new roof, but repairing the flashings and roof gutters puts your house in a solid light. Buyers might not expect a new roof, but they don't want to find leaks.
	There are a variety of specific things that a home inspection can look for, depending on individual concerns. For example, a radon inspection checks a home for levels of radioactive gas and takes between two and seven days to complete. Termite inspection looks for damage to the wood structures of a home. With homes that have a well for water, well water testing is another option; for homes with a septic or oil tank, examination of those structures may be part of an inspection as well.
	A general inspection should consider the condition of the roof, the water pressure and plumbing, electrical outlets and switches, and the crawl space and attic, according to HGTV.